Metalworking

Metalworking is the craft of working with metals to create objects or machine parts. The term covers a wide range, from large ships and bridges to delicate jewellery and instruments. This craft covers a wide range of skills and entails the use of many types of tools.

Blacksmithing - Drilling & Threading - General - Lathes - Welding - Projects - Free eBooks

Blacksmithing

Blacksmiths work with iron and steel, the black color comes from fire scale, a layer of oxides that forms on the surface of the metal during heating. The term 'smith' originates from the word 'smite', which means 'to hit'. Thus, a blacksmith is a person who smites black metal.
Blacksmiths work by heating wrought iron or steel until the metal becomes soft enough to be shaped with hand tools, such as a hammer, anvil and chisel. Heating is accomplished by the use of a forge fueled by propane, natural gas, coal, charcoal, or coke.

Anvil Making

Beautiful Iron - created for blacksmiths by a blacksmith

Blacksmith Basics

Free Gas Forge Plans

Drilling & Threading

Thread Cutting (Includes Tap & Drill Chart)

When building or repairing machinery it is often necessary to cut threads by hand, to cut inside threads a tap is used, for outside threads a die is used. There are several different standards for threads, SAE, Metric and British Standard Whitworth are three common examples, for the purpose of this page the SAE standards, will be discussed.

Thread Cutting (Includes Tap & Drill Chart)

Threads 101

Working with toy steam engines from different countries can become very confusing, American engines will have UNC threads, British will have Whitworth and German will have Metric as a general rule. To further complicate matters many engines sold previous to the first world war were manufactured in Germany for the American and British markets.

Threads 101

Drill Bit Sharpening FAQ

Homemade Drill Press Vise

General

Practical Mechanics For Boys

This book takes the beginner through a comprehensive series of practical shop work, in which the uses of tools, and the structure and handling of shop machinery are set forth; how they are utilized to perform the work, and the manner in which all dimensional work is carried out. Every subject is illustrated, and model building explained. It contains a glossary which comprises a new system of cross references, a feature that will prove a welcome departure in explaining subjects. Fully illustrated online reprint

Practical Mechanics For Boys

Electric Motor Basics

There are many types of electric motors, some smaller than a human hair others large enough to power a locomotive. For the purpose of this page we will be discussing induction motors which are typically found on most workshop machinery such as air compressors, drill presses, table saws, band saws, jointers, shapers and lathes.

Electric Motor Basics

Gear and Pulley Speeds

When building or modifying machinery it is necessary to calculate the size of gears or pulleys required to run a tool at a certain speed. Sometimes it is relatively simple, if you are replacing a 3450 RPM motor with a 1725 RPM one usually all you have to do is double the size of the pulley on the motor to run the machine at the same speed, other times it becomes a little more complicated.

Gear and Pulley Speeds

Design Guidelines For Springs

Fundamentals of Machine Tools (US Army)

Gears: An Introduction

How to Make Springs

Introduction To Milling

Machining Rules Of Thumb

Marking Out, Measurement, Fitting & Assembly

Metal Spinning

- Reprint of 1912 book, outling principles, tools and methods used, dated but good information.

Metalworking.com

Shop Safety Handout

Lathes

Turning and Boring on a Lathe

by Franklin D. Jones

Published by Industrial Press 1914

A special treatise for machinists students in industrial and engineering schools, and apprentices on turning and boring methods including modern practice with engine lathes, vertical, and horizontal boring machines.

Turning and Boring on a Lathe

Buying a Lathe 101

Purchasing a lathe can be a bewildering experience, and at times very disappointing if one has not done their homework.

Lathes come in three sizes, too big, too small or just right, so the lathe you select very much depends on what you will be using it for. Small parts can be turned on a large lathe but it just doesn't feel right, everything around the part is just too big. Large parts can not be turned on a small lathe if they exceed the lathes capacity so a lathe should be selected to fit the type of work that will be done on it most of the time.

Buying a Lathe 101

Sears Companion Lathe Page

It all started of quite innocently, I was browsing eBay and saw a small lathe, the bids were still quite low and upon inquiring, yes, the seller would ship to Canada for a very reasonable rate and he was very happy to answer any questions. When the auction ended I had purchased a small lathe of a so far unknown brand. As I waited for it to arrive I searched online to identify it and finally determined it was a Sears Companion. It has a 6" swing and 18" center to center capacity.

Sears Companion Lathe Page

Building My Gingery Style Lathe

Welding

Welding Basics101

Welding is basically a method of melting two sections of metal together with the use of an electric arc or gas flame and at the same time melting a wire rod into the joint for additional strength. To sheild the metal from oxidizing as it is being welded either a flux coating is added to the wire rod or a gas is expelled from the welding tip.
Three types of welders are usually found in home workshops, stick, wire-feed or oxy-acetylene, each has its advantages, most shops will have either a stick welder or a wire feed for welding and an oxy-acetylene torch for brazing and cutting.

Welding Basics 101

Brazing

Do-It-Yourself Welding Projects

Four By Four Onboard Welder

Home Brew Spot Welder

Home Built Arc Welder

Introduction to Arc Welding

Oxy-Acetylene Welding

Tig Welding

Welding Table

Welding Theory and Application (US Army)

Projects

A Simple Single-Acting Steam Engine

The engravings show a simple steam engine, which requires no difficult lathe work; in fact the whole of the work may be done on a very ordinary foot lathe. The engine is necessarily single-acting, but it is effective nevertheless, being about 1-20 H. P., with suitable steam supply. It is of sufficient size to run a foot lathe, scroll saw, or two or three sewing machines.

A Simple Single-Acting Steam Engine

Hired Man - Adjustable Stand

On the farm this was always referred to as the "Hired Man" by my father.
It can be lowered enough to work with a metal cutting band saw, or raised high enough for a radial arm saw or a miter saw on a workmate.

Hired Man - Adjustable Stand

Bandsaw Mods

Bandsaw Stop and Vice Mod

Build a Child's Backhoe

Build a Forge From a Car Wheel

Build a Welding Table

Hardened Keyway Cutter and Keyed Bushing

Hoisting Crane

Make a Machinists Jack

Press (With hydraulic jack)

Tubing Bender

Free eBooks from Project Gutenberg

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Do-It-101 Related Pages

Welding Basics 101

Scrap Pile Tools 101

Before shortening a bolt thread a nut on to it, make your cut, file the edges, then remove the nut.


When drilling large holes in steel start with a small bit and make a pilot hole.


Install hacksaw blades with the teeth pointing away from the handle. The thinner the material the finer the blade.


Ordinary lard makes a good cutting oil when cutting threads in mild steel.


Use a centerpunch to place a dimple at the spot you wish to drill to prevent the bit from wandering.


The set on a new hacksaw blade will be wider than a used blade, if you have to replace a blade part way through a cut start a new cut from the opposite side to meet the original cut.


Store files wrapped in cloth or cardboard to prevent them from contacting each other and damaging the cutting edges.


Cutting Oils

Steel: sulfurized cutting oil or "soluble" oil.

Cast Iron: drills dry

Aluminum: mineral spirits or kerosene.

Brass: drills dry.

Copper: whole milk or light cream.

Patent Prints from
Vintage Internet Patents


PRACTICAL MECHANICS FOR BOYS
By J. S. ZERBE, M.E.

This book takes the beginner through a comprehensive series of practical shop work, in which the uses of tools, and the structure and handling of shop machinery are set forth; how they are utilized to perform the work, and the manner in which all dimensional work is carried out. Every subject is illustrated, and model building explained. It contains a glossary which comprises a new system of cross references, a feature that will prove a welcome departure in explaining subjects. Fully illustrated.

Copyright, 1914, by
THE NEW YORK BOOK COMPANY

Publisher's disclaimer: Information provided is dated and is for information purposes only.

Online Reprint


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